Big Project

Hey Everybody, "first time caller, long time listener" as the radio callers say.

I've been running a small 30L setup with a baby dragon for 2-3 years, and have enjoyed this forum, as well as the equipment to the fullest. First and foremost thanks for making it possible discover distilling safely and thanks for all the tips and tricks.

I work for a brewery that recently moved into a big former food processing factory ground. The production was canned food, sauces and ready meals, and there is two gigantic steam boilers (7+9 tonnes in hour!) and loads of old stainless processing plants left to dust in the corners.
Our brewery will be operational in December hopefully.

So when there's a lot of beer, steam and boilers available why not make some booze?!

I've tried to make a simple flow diagram, of the basic paths (attached) My dream is to make a steady production of whiskey as well as being able to make whatever pops into our minds (just like the freedom with StillDragon setups). I want to distill twice, and have the opportunity to run through a column.
It's starts with finished wash from our brewery in a holding tank, dosing into a wash still (combined of three 1000L vessels) These boilers are actually old dehydrators/mixers, and can go down to -1 bar pressure. So basically the strip process could potentially be under vacuum. The spirit still is made an old 1300L boiler where we want to retrofit a new copper top (the existing top has a lot of small connections) and it would be a good excuse to get some copper involved when operating in pot mode.

I was hoping to get some feedback on the paths, maybe some insights in possible benefit/cons with lowering the pressure in the strip stills.

There's also the possibility on making two separate setup, where one of them are 100% vacuum. But i'm not sure there's not much to gain when our goal is not to make vacuum distilled/herbal gins and vodka as the primary subject, and we already have heat involved in the mashing.

Any inputs are warmly welcomed, right now is time for more philosophical stuff, setups and possibilities. Details, number crunching and specific values are to follow....

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Comments

  • Hell of a first post :-O

    FC

  • edited August 17

    I noticed you have a pair of 8" columns drawn into your diagram. How much ceiling height will you have to play with?

    StillDragon North America - Your StillDragon® Distributor for North America

  • @Smaug: there’s 7 meter to ceiling, would it better to run with one big stack instead of two next to each other?

  • @FloridaCracker said: Hell of a first post :-O

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  • @mortenbruun said: Smaug: there’s 7 meter to ceiling, would it better to run with one big stack instead of two next to each other?

    Yes. You'll get much more compliant behavior. And by that I mean that you'll only have to futz with one dephlegmator, you will significantly reduce the amount of previously distilled alcohol getting sent back to the boiler. And that will make it easier to keep your proof up as well as increase your collection speed.

    StillDragon North America - Your StillDragon® Distributor for North America

  • We need to see photos of this mofo once complete.

  • @Smaug Makes sense, and that’s a long list of benefits. I’m thinking Dash column because of the CIP possibility. If it was for the looks i’d go with Crystal Dragons. When the column only sees low wines and not washes, would sprayballs be necessary at all?

  • @mortenbruun said: Smaug Makes sense, and that’s a long list of benefits. I’m thinking Dash column because of the CIP possibility. If it was for the looks i’d go with Crystal Dragons. When the column only sees low wines and not washes, would sprayballs be necessary at all?

    IMO no. Simply connect to the PC and pump everything back to the kettle

    StillDragon North America - Your StillDragon® Distributor for North America

  • A single column is always superior

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