Triticale

I have just found a source of triticale and i will receive the grains next week. Does anyone have any experience with this grain? Or alternatively any pointers to using unmalted grain. I have 4 recipes that i want to try with this stuff. A bourbon, a whiskey, a quinoa and triticale whiskey and a straight triticale. I just havent used unmalter grains before.

Comments

  • You'll need to do a cereal mash and then use either malt barley or enzymes.
    You are in for a treat, i've played with Triticale before and it's a beautiful spicy spirit. One of th best grains around i think.

    StillDragon Australia & New Zealand - Your StillDragon® Distributor for Australia & New Zealand

  • @DonMateo said: I have just found a source of triticale and i will receive the grains next week. Does anyone have any experience with this grain?

    Keep the tribbles away from it!

    I'm more like I am now than I was before.

  • Well after looking for 2 years i finally found a farmer about 200kms south who grows it as a rotation crop. He is selling for 20cents a kilo. When he asked how much I wanted I said 400kgs. I asked him how much do you have and he said 90 tons. If only i had my distillery up and running i could go through a fews tons.

    Thanks @punkin

  • hey @punkin Does triticale turn into a gelatenous mess like high rye washes ?? Or is it clean to work with, ie makes a thin wash, like a malted wheat wash ?

  • edited April 16

    Triticale is high in beta-glucan, it can be difficult.

    Also remember, usually triticale is used raw - unmalted - meaning higher glucans than malted grain. So while malted wheat is easy, unmalted is less so. And triticale is a hybrid of wheat and rye.

    Beta-glucanase enzyme is your friend when dealing with unmalted grain, especially oat, rye, and the high-BG hybrids, etc. Add in the high temp alpha amylase and the cereal mash becomes significantly easier.

  • Thanks @grim. I have some beta glucanase. Thanks very much.

  • edited April 16

    Do you have a maltster near you mate?

    They may be interested in a small batch run for you, i mean not 400kg, but maybe a ton or two?

    StillDragon Australia & New Zealand - Your StillDragon® Distributor for Australia & New Zealand

  • Mate, No mate I am in the middle of nowhere. 1100km from the nearest maltster. But thanks for the suggestion. When I can finally find a shed I was considering malting my own grain for things like triticale but maybe I should consider that more. There are enough people with agriculture degrees who could do it here. Thanks again mate. Matt

  • edited April 16

    You may find you like the flavor profile of unmalted grain better. Having worked with unmalted rye and wheat now - let me tell you - I think unmalted grain makes better whiskey. It's an overall cleaner flavor profile, if that's your kinda thing.

    A lot of higher alcohol and congeners are created by the amino acids that are broken down in the malting process. More aminos, more tails alcohols.

    Most American Bourbon is actually 70-80% unmalted grain when you consider that corn and rye are typically always unmalted. Maybe its just my Yankee palate likes it better.

  • Agreed that there is nothing wrong with using enzymes either.

    StillDragon Australia & New Zealand - Your StillDragon® Distributor for Australia & New Zealand

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