StillDragon® Community Forum

Welcome!

Be part of our community & join our international next generation forum now!

In this Discussion

Why run NGS through 4 plates before a Gin Basket?

I see a few micro distilleries running NGS through 4 or 6 plates to a gin basket.. Why? Surely the ABV off a 30% charge into a gin basket would be just fine.

Help me understand why as I am just planning on running a pot still to make gin. Have i got my head in the wrong place with this thinking?

Comments

  • It was explained to me by a customer who has been winning international medals for decades that the GNS has improved leap years over those twenty years but still needs a heads cut to reach his standards.

    No reason you can't do that heads cut with a potstill, it just won't be as compressed.

    StillDragon Australia & New Zealand - Your StillDragon® Distributor for Australia & New Zealand

  • I have been taking a heads cut when I have been doing a gin run to take out the heavy juniper oil components of the run. When you think about it, its normally 2-3 % of the final volume which is an equivalent of the first parts of a head cut. The process works both ways. But I what would I know and I havent won any international medals, yet.

  • ok, makes sense.. compression of "heads" cut, I am hoping that running with 2kw on a 40l charge will be slow enough to allow the heavy juniper oil cut to incorporate the heads also..

  • I make gin from GNS using a potstill, and yes I do make a heads cut. Primarily to get rid of the juniper oil, any imperfections in the GNS caught are a bonus - not that I've found many in mine. I do take that heads cut very slowly.

  • edited September 30

    And of course the white elephant in the room is that it also allows for the distillery to utilize certain descriptors for the finished product that might otherwise be somewhat misleading to purists.

    Of course that tact may also be also somewhat misleading to a purist.

    Not judging at all BTW. The GNS model makes a lot of sense on several levels.

    StillDragon North America - Your StillDragon® Distributor for North America

  • @Smaug in fact historically there might not be anything wrong with using GNS: genever production in the Netherlands was split into two separate businesses, strictly kept separate by the tax authorities. One made the alcohol from grain, the other was called a "fine distillery" which bought the alcohol and added botanicals to make a quality product. The UK has "redistilling" licenses nowadays. "Grain to glass" seems to be an American thing, especially when talking about gin production. Rum and whisky are a different matter of course.

  • by using plates in a vapor infusion setup, it seems that you get higher alcohol concentration through the botanicals.. good or bad, the water soluble components would seem to be lower..

  • edited October 1

    I believe the effervescence that happens when dilutiing distilate down to drinking strength drives off desirable volatiles extracted from the botanicals. So, I dilute my botanical run still charge to an alcohol percentage that produces the disired drinking strength right off of the still. Adding four plates upstream from the gin basket would make the proof of the product more difficult to control.

    It is two different processes. Separate them. Do a cuts run. Then circle back and do a botanicals run with no cuts needed.

    I'm more like I am now than I was before.

  • @Kapea said: I believe the effervescence that happens when dilutiing distilate down to drinking strength drives off desirable volatiles extracted from the botanicals. So, I dilute my botanical run still charge to an alcohol percentage that produces the disired drinking strength right off of the still. Adding four plates upstream from the gin basket would make the proof of the product more difficult to control.

    It is two different processes. Separate them. Do a cuts run. Then circle back and do a botanicals run with no cuts needed.

    Thats what I do

  • edited October 8

    Very different approach from the UK crew who seems that multi-shot is the way to go (first make a gin-flavor concentrate and then dilute with ngs and water).

    I suspect the methodology developed not because it's better, but because those guys are running undersized stills and were looking for a way to speed up production.

  • There are certainly different priorities between hobbyists and professional distillers.
    As a hobbyist, quality of product is the prime consideration for me. Cost and time are given low priority. In fact time spent on production is a big part of the enjoyment of the hobby.

    Pros must find a way to make the best product possible while balancing the cost to do so. A very different driver.

    I'm more like I am now than I was before.

Sign In or Register to comment.