40% Second Run and the Location of Cut Points

Lets say I make a second run of 40% from a pot still and the cut point for heads/hearts would at 75%, and the cut point for hearts/tails is 60%.

If instead of running at 40%, I dilute that further before I run it out of caution for an electric element what effect if any will there be on the location of the cut points.

Comments

  • So subjective. One person's early hearts is another's late heads.

    I'd simply collect with smaller vessels and evaluate after the run. I'd only try and make the call on the fly after having executed the recipe multiple times with small collection vessels to consistently identify where the cut is.

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  • edited April 23

    @Rocky_Creek said: If instead of running at 40%, I dilute that further before I run it out of caution for an electric element what effect if any will there be on the location of the cut points.

    They will be lower, but like @smaug says, you'll need to determine your new points.

    By the way, nobody should ever cut by proof, I would never recommend anyone attempt to cut flavored spirit by still head temperature or by proof. Always by flavor and aroma. Following proof and temperature is a good way to know where you are, but the actual cut itself, tongue and nose.

    The scots cut by proof because they were prohibited by law from tasting or smelling the distillate, they didn't do it because it was a better way to distill. That little fact seems to be lost to obscurity, and everyone follows the old scotch methodologies, books, papers, thinking that's the right way to go.

  • I am sure that today, ...every Scot in the craft business does not adhere to this. :-S

  • The main reason I asked is because of lack of experience. I used calcium carbonate and it about eliminated heads that I could detect. Fores of course were still there. In the actual run that I did I cut 160 to 100 proof. The resulting mix when diluted to 90 proof was almost identical to Climax moonshine. I checked the PH of Climax and a cheap vodka and both were about 3.5, a strong acid. Mine was slightly more basic than pure alcohol which is 7.3. I did notice a range of totally smell free alcohol in the middle of what I kept. Since this was the first spirit run since I got back into this I was proud to get what I got. I'm also somewhat smelling impaired. Next spirit run will be tighter or thru the VM. Thanks for the info.

  • You've got to work with what you have at hand. If your nose is shot, your palette is as well. If taste and smell can't be your guide then go by proof/temp. Are you the only person drinking this product? If so, no biggy. If you were an emerging/aspiring commercial distiller with a palette fault, I'd suggest you find a "nose" apprentice ASAP.

    Cheers,

    Mech.

  • @Rocky_Creek said: I'm also somewhat smelling impaired. Next spirit run will be tighter or thru the VM. Thanks for the info.

    I am not impaired but I noticed a higher nose sensitivity after beginning practising nasal cleaning with water. It's an Indian hygienic practice also common in Yoga. You can find videos on YouTube with "neti pot" "nasal cleaning" etc. It's good for your health and for your sense of smell.

  • Alcohol anesthetizes your olfactory receptor neurons and olfactory nerves. Rinsing them with water won't change that.

    I'm more like I am now than I was before.

  • @Kapea said: Alcohol anesthetizes your olfactory receptor neurons and olfactory nerves. Rinsing them with water won't change that.

    Can you please elaborate?

    An Anesthetic effect is only temporary. Do you refer to a long-term effect due to normal consumption of alcohol?

    @Rocky_Creek never did not say he is alcohol-dependent or that he drinks alcohol excessively, so I would like to know if you link long-term normal consumption of alcohol to olfactory damage, and if you can offer a source supporting such an hypothesis.

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