What is your favorite method of proofing your spirits?

I use reverse osmosis when I proof, I still need to run end product through carbon filter, just to make sure it is crystal clear. What is your favorite water to use?

Best Answers

  • RO + Deionization

  • Tap water!!! Lol. Seriously though, my tap water is really low mineral.

    Really clean tasting.

    Filtered through Welsh mountains and such...

    I hear it's better to measure out your water then add the alcohol to the water but I find it harder to hit the mark that way (and I'm a bit anal about it being as close to 40% as possible if that's what I write on the bottle)

  • I read about slow proofing a while back, so gave it a go. had some rum, 88%. Made up 250ml at 40% and put in one jar. Put 100ml of 88% in another jar and added 20ml water. Added 20ml per week for 6 weeks till it hit 40%. The slow blended jar is alot smoother, smell is very slight compared to other jar. It is very similar to a aged aired white rum, pretty surprised with th results. Want to try it on a bigger scale to see if results are the same. Oh, and the slow blended one was 20ml less total volume at the end, must have been evaporation

  • I use bottled spring water to dilute and I use volume method.
    To work out correct volumes I made up an excel spreadsheet that accounts for collapse (or whatever you call it).
    I should probably get a decent set of scales. Some of my food recipes are converted to grains as my powder scales are the only accurate ones I have =))

Answers

  • What is your process of proofing.

  • edited June 2016

    Process? The Uncle Sam way. Although I do like Alcodens.

    Hobby side? Trial and error, patience. If you are going to do it mathematically, do it all by weight, do not waste your time trying to use volume.

  • What's the Uncle Sam way @grim? I agree with your comment on weight and therefore density and temperature...unfortunately the ATO insist on reporting in terms of LALs, so volumes always come back into the calculations.

  • I really didn't expect slow proofing to make a long term difference. I assume that both jars were left open for equal times, to control for air exposure?

  • edited June 2016

    @grim said: Process? The Uncle Sam way. Although I do like Alcodens.

    Hobby side? Trial and error, patience. If you are going to do it mathematically, do it all by weight, do not waste your time trying to use volume.

    Just a hobbiest at distilling, me. I use mass and volume (density).
    Class A volumetric flask and a lab balance.

    Diluted to drinking proof with carbon filtered rainwater.

    I'm more like I am now than I was before.

  • Another handloader, eh? I've still got some recipes in grains.

    Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

    my book, Making Fine Spirits

  • Add distilled water to spirit until it is what I want. I now proof to 45% instead of 40%. That 5% difference can keep it from getting cloudy in my experience

  • edited June 2016

    When I run gin through my gin basket I let the still do the proofing. Into the boiler at 18-20%. Off the still at drinking strength of 50-52%. No post run dilution for my gin.

    In fact I've begun playing with dilution in the boiler to target drinking strength off the still on most of my spirits. Post-run dilution seems to mute the desirable subtle flavors. I suspect it is related to the exothermic reaction and off-gassing that occurs when water is added to the spirit.

    @Smaug is the one who started me thinking about this.

    I'm more like I am now than I was before.

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